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AI for Our Emotions

AI for Our Emotions

Video cameras and face recognition have been around for a very long time. The 1920s witnessed the birth of the first mechanical video cameras, using spinning disks with light-sensitive elements to capture and project moving images. The 1930s ushered in the era of electronic video cameras with Vladimir Zworykin’s invention of the iconoscope in 1931. It laid the groundwork for electronic television systems. These cameras used electron beams to capture images on a light-sensitive target, offering superior image quality and flexibility. Then, the development of video recording formats like VHS in the 1950s revolutionized video capture and playback. Subsequent decades saw advancements in video camera technology, with the rise of solid-state sensors, high-definition formats, and miniaturization, leading to the compact and powerful digital video cameras we use today.

The concept of face recognition by computers emerged in the 1960s. Pioneering efforts by Woodrow Bledsoe and his team at Stanford involved manually labeling facial features on photographs and using computer algorithms to match them. The 1970s and 1980s saw continued research but limited computational power and facial recognition algorithms struggled with variations in pose, lighting, and expression. The breakthroughs came in the 1990s with feature extraction techniques and the rise of AI neural networks.  These developments led to more robust algorithms which could extract distinctive facial features and perform better matching. The 2000s and beyond have seen the explosion of AI deep learning techniques. Deep learning algorithms trained on massive datasets of faces significantly improved accuracy. This era also saw the rise of facial recognition applications in various sectors, from security and law enforcement to social media and marketing.

Today, video cameras and face recognition are often used together. Security cameras can capture video footage, and face recognition algorithms can analyze the video and that of social media to identify individuals. That is how the FBI was able to prosecute the January 6 gang which broke into the Capital building so quickly.

The increasing sophistication of face recognition technology has raised significant concerns about privacy and potential misuse. As these technologies continue to evolve, discussions on ethical considerations, regulations, and potential biases remain crucial aspects of their future. And now we are about to see a new dimension: technology which recognizes human emotions. What emotions? Anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, neutrality, sadness, and surprise to name a few.

Electronics360 tackled this emerging technology with an extensive article. The reporter offered a good summary.

Emotion recognition technology seeks to establish a link between machines and human emotions, enabling computers to comprehend and respond to the nuances of our emotional states. This technology allows for personalized interactions based on the user’s emotions, resulting in more customized and captivating experiences that enhance the intuitive and responsive nature of technology. For instance, a virtual assistant can adjust its responses to align with the user’s mood, fostering a more authentic and empathetic interaction.

The basics of emotion recognition involve identifying and comprehending of human emotions using cues like facial expressions, voice tone, and body language. This is made possible using AI deep learning algorithms which analyze and interpret cues which it extracts from an analysis of facial expressions, the tone, pitch, and intonation in our voices, an interpretation of our body language. AI machine learning models tie it all together and classifies human emotions.

Emotion recognition technology has potential in many industries which could benefit from infusing a human touch into interactions with machines. For example, the millions of us using virtual assistants in our daily work or hobbies. Emotion recognition technology could respond empathetically if it detects sadness in a user’s voice. The result could be a more individualized and even captivating experience.

I think one of the big areas which could benefit is customer service. Emotion recognition technology could assess emotions conveyed in customer reviews. Companies could gain insights into how customers feel about products and services and adjust their offerings. In the interim while there are still human customer service agents, their computer screen could light up with “this customer is very frustrated and unhappy”.

In the healthcare sector, emotion recognition technology could help evaluating and overseeing patients’ emotional well-being. For example, it could identify indicators of depression or anxiety by scrutinizing facial expressions and voice patterns during telehealth sessions. Electronics360 said, “It could be used to gauge patient satisfaction, identify areas for improvement, and enhance the overall patient experience.”

Like all new technologies, there is great potential but accompanying challenges. There is diversity in the cross-cultural expressions. A facial expression showing happiness in one culture might reflect an entirely different emotion in another. Emotions are subjective. A smile might signify happiness while masking other emotions like nervousness or sarcasm. Emotion recognition systems will have to decipher emotions in diverse contexts while considering the individual disparities and the subtleties inherent in human expression.

Electronics360 summarized the technology saying,

Emotion recognition technology is on the frontier of human-machine interaction, promising a future where our devices understand and respond to our emotions seamlessly. It is a powerful tool that enhances the way we interact with machines, make business decisions, and address societal challenges. By combining computer vision and machine learning techniques, researchers are making strides in decoding the intricate language of human emotion conveyed through facial expressions, voice, and body language.

As AI advances, emotion recognition technology will also advance. I believe the potential applications will broaden and show the potential for a more intricate and compassionate integration of AI into our everyday experiences. If only I could capture the emotions of readers as they consume this blog post.

Note: I use Gemini AI and other AI chatbots as my research assistants. AI can boost productivity for anyone who creates content. Sometimes I get incorrect data from AI, and when something looks suspicious, I dig deeper. Sometimes the data varies by sources where AI finds it. I take responsibility for my posts and if anyone spots an error, I will appreciate knowing it, and will correct it.

Healthcare Innovation

Healthcare Innovation

One of the things which can keep your brain healthy is to keep stimulating it. I do that through my reading, writing, and speaking. This week, my brain was super-stimulated by attending an all-day Nuvance Health Neuroscience Institute Symposium. Dr. Paul Wright, MD, MBA and SVP, System Chair for Neuroscience at Nuvance Health assembled a set of experts each of whom described their area of specialty and discussed the state of the art for treatments. Some of the slides and videos were mind boggling. You can see the list of speakers and their topics below.

Neuroscience is a fascinating field which explores the nervous system including the brain, spinal cord, and all the nerves that connect them. It delves into how these intricate structures work together to generate thoughts, emotions, movements, and our perception of the world. Neuroscience is a vast and interdisciplinary field encompassing various subfields which approach the nervous system from different angles.

I asked Gemini what some of the subfields are: Here is the list:

  • Neurology: The science behind how we think, feel, and move, bridging the gap between mind and matter.
  • Neuroanatomy: Studies the structure and organization of the nervous system, from individual neurons to complex brain regions.
  • Neurophysiology: Focuses on the electrical and chemical signals that allow neurons to communicate and generate brain activity.
  • Neurochemistry: Explores the intricate dance of neurotransmitters and other molecules that influence brain function and behavior.
  • Neuropharmacology: Investigates the effects of drugs and medications on the nervous system.
  • Cognitive neuroscience: Examines the neural basis of higher-level cognitive functions like memory, learning, language, and decision-making.
  • Behavioral neuroscience: Links brain activity with specific behaviors.
  • Computational neuroscience: Applies principles of computer science and mathematics to model brain function.
  • Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery is a crucial subfield of neuroscience. While neuroscience encompasses the broad spectrum of studying the nervous system, neurosurgery applies the knowledge in a practical way. Neurosurgeons use their understanding of the nervous system to perform delicate surgeries on the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. These surgeries aim to treat various neurological conditions, injuries, and tumors.

All of the presentations at the Symposium were revealing, but the one which I was least familiar with was about Endovascular Coil Embolization for the treatment of aneurysms in the brain. I lost a friend some years ago to a brain aneurysm. At the time, it was reported the neurosurgeon had said, after opening the man’s skull, there was nothing else he could do. Treatment of the ballooning of weakened blood vessels in the brain is very intricate. Advancements in medical technology have introduced some scalpel-less options for aneurysm treatment.

The endovascular coil embolization procedure involves inserting a catheter, a thin flexible tube, into an artery and navigating it through blood vessels until it reaches the base of the aneurysm. The pictures in the presentation showed once in position, tiny coils were deployed from the catheter and packed into the aneurysm. The coils induce clotting within the aneurysm, essentially blocking it off and preventing blood flow into the weakened pouch. One slide showed how the brain aneurysm was completely eliminated. I am not sure how long this procedure has been widely used. The approach avoids the need for a large incision in the skull and reduces recovery time compared to traditional surgery. Continuous improvements and innovations are being made as neurosurgeons gain more experience.

The field of neuroscience is constantly evolving, with exciting advancements happening all the time. Technologies like fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) and PET scans continue to improve the ability to map brain activity with high resolution. Brain-computer interfaces and implants such as Elon Musk’s Neuralink are making significant progress, allowing people with paralysis or other neurological conditions to control external devices using their thoughts. Optogenetics is a technique which uses light to manipulate specific sets of neurons, providing a powerful tool for understanding brain circuits. Gene editing with CRISPR and other gene-editing tools are opening doors to potentially treat neurological disorders by modifying genes. AI is impacting neuroscience by helping analyze vast amounts of brain data and develop new models of brain function.

It looks to me like the future of neuroscience holds immense promise. As research continues, we can expect further breakthroughs. A deeper understanding of the brain could revolutionize treatment for conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, depression, and anxiety. Understanding consciousness and free will are fundamental mysteries neuroscience is constantly exploring, and future discoveries could shed light on the very nature of what it means to be human.

The Jean Bottini Neuroscience Symposium at Nuvance Health’s The Vassar Brothers Medical Center in Poughkeepsie, New York on Tuesday, April 9th, 2024, was a full and inspiring day.

Following was the agenda of presentations.

Welcome and State of the Union
Paul Wright, MD, MBA
SVP, System Chair
Nuvance Health Neuroscience Institute

Keynote Address
Invisible Forces: How They Can Shape a Career – The third Trimester
David Langer, MD
Chair, Department of Neurosurgery, Lenox Hill Hospital
Vice President, Neurosurgery, Western Region, Northwell Health
Professor, Neurosurgery and Radiology
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell

Management of Intracranial Hemorrhage
Jon Lebovitz, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Danbury & Norwalk, CT
Nuvance Health

Use of the Modified Orbitozygomatic Approach for Skull Base and Vascular Lesions
David Penn, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Poughkeepsie, NY
Nuvance Health

Vascular imaging for ischemic stroke
Sea Mi Park, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Poughkeepsie, NY
Nuvance Health

Panel Discussion: Vascular & Open Cerebrovascular & endovascular neurosurgeries
David Langer, Jon Lebovitz, Sea Mi Park, & David Penn, MD

Dystonia: An Overview of Syndromes and Current and Emerging Therapies
Thomas Steeves, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Poughkeepsie, NY
Nuvance Health

Migraine is not just a headache – Updates in migraine treatment
Hida Nierenburg, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Poughkeepsie, NY

Acute Care Physical Therapy Goals and Discharge Planning
Matthew St. Pierre, PT
Physical Medicine, VBMC

Epilepsy – Medication Treatments & Beyond
Robert Bonwetsch, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Danbury, CT
Nuvance Health

Peripheral Neuropathy: Current Treatments & Advances
Matthew Imperioli, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Danbury, CT
Nuvance Health

PD 1 inhibitors and Low Grade Glioma treatments
Adesh Tandon, MD.
Oncological neurosurgery
Neuroscience Institute, Poughkeepsie, NY
Nuvance Health

Cervical Myelopathy: Current Treatments & Advances
Michael Cho, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Poughkeepsie, NY
Nuvance Health

Pain medicine updates at Nuvance
Raj Murthy, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Poughkeepsie, NY
Nuvance Health

Post Stroke Rehabilitation
Huma Naqvi, MD
Neuroscience Institute, Norwalk, CT
Nuvance Health

Closing Remarks
Paul Wright, MD, MBA
SVP, System Chair, Neuroscience, Nuvance Health

Note: I use Gemini AI and other AI chatbots as my research assistants. AI can boost productivity for anyone who creates content. Sometimes I get incorrect data from AI, and when something looks suspicious, I dig deeper. Sometimes the data varies by sources where AI finds it. I take responsibility for my posts and if anyone spots an error, I will appreciate knowing it, and will correct it.

Current Events by John R. Patrick - 04/12/2024

New sections may appear every week or just when I have something new to share.

March 28th was my 13th Tech Talk at Hammock Dunes Club. A PDF of my talk is at https://johnpatrick.com/techtalk13.pdf. The video is now available on my YouTube channel. I need to do some editing. I hope to have the final link next week.

The next talk was for the Economic Round Table – San Francisco  on Wednesday via Zoom. It was members and guests only. I will post here when the Zoom is live on my YouTube channel. 

The next talk will be for the Newtown, CT Men’s Club next week. More talks are scheduled in May and June. 

A near perfect day when we departed Palm Coast to return to CT.
The first thing I saw after we landed in White Plains, NY
Two more brilliant colored pencils by Joanne.
A brilliant keynote speech by Dr. David Langer at the Nuvance Neuroscience Symposium.

BTC price see-saws as halving event approaches: BTC price action remains choppy as we approach the Bitcoin halving, which is estimated to take place April 20th. It will be determined by an algorithm. Some investors believe there is too much optimism priced into Bitcoin, and we could see a correction in the days before and after the halving.

Since it’s already Friday, April 12th, 2024, the information about what’s new in AI this week (typically referring to the previous week) might be slightly outdated. To stay on top of things, let’s explore some of the advancements that captured attention around April 2nd to April 5th, 2024:

1. Personalized Learning with AI: Researchers are making strides in using AI to personalize learning experiences. This week, a study showcased an AI-powered tutoring system that tailors learning plans to individual student needs, potentially improving educational outcomes [Source: Science Daily].

2. Enhanced Dexterity for Robots: The quest for robots that can handle complex tasks continues. This week, a research team unveiled an AI system that allows robots to perform actions requiring dexterity and fine motor skills, like using tools or manipulating objects [Source: IEEE Spectrum]. This could revolutionize automation in various industries.

3. Progress in Explainable AI (XAI): As AI models become more complex, understanding their decision-making process becomes crucial. This week, there were advancements in XAI techniques. Researchers developed methods to make it easier to interpret how AI models arrive at their conclusions, fostering trust and transparency in their applications [Source: VentureBeat].

4. AI Tackles Climate Change: AI is being harnessed to address climate change issues. This week, a group launched an AI platform designed to analyze vast datasets on climate and develop strategies for mitigating climate risks [Source: TechCrunch].

5. Generative AI for Material Discovery: Scientists are exploring the potential of generative AI models to accelerate material discovery. This week, there was news about an AI system designed to generate new materials with desired properties, potentially leading to breakthroughs in fields like medicine and clean energy [Source: Nature Journal].

Staying Updated on AI News:

Here are some tips to stay updated on the latest advancements in AI:

  • Follow AI News Websites and Publications: Websites like AI Weekly, MIT Technology Review, and VentureBeat frequently publish articles on cutting-edge AI research and developments.
  • Subscribe to Newsletters: Many AI research labs and organizations offer newsletters that provide summaries of their latest work.
  • Attend AI Conferences and Events: Attending conferences and events allows you to learn about new research and network with AI experts.
  • Follow AI Researchers on Social Media: Many AI researchers share their work and insights on social media platforms like Twitter and LinkedIn.

By following these tips, you can stay informed about the exciting progress being made in the field of AI.

I have appeared in two new articles this month:

Sun and Surf Magazine of Palm Coast, FL published, “AI: Should We Fear it or Embrace it?”

A new magazine in Ridgefield, CT called Ridgefield City Lifestyle has published, “AI and Healthcare: A conversation with Dr. John patrick about how AI is transforming the healthcare space

My YouTube channel is at http://www.youtube.com/jrpatric

Following are videos of talks I gave this year. I have been fortunate to be able to share my thoughts on technology with a number of groups. 

On September 14, I gave a talk on AI at the Ridgefield Library in Ridgefield, CT.

On July 21, I gave a lecture on AI @FoundersHallCT. I wan’t sure how many would turn out. It was a lot. Great interest in the topic. In addition to current events and outlooks, I told the audience about Robot Attitude: How Robots and Artificial Intelligence Will Make Our Lives Better

On March 8th I was the guest speaker at the first meeting of Probus in Palm Coast, Florida on March 8. Probus is a worldwide organization of retired and semi-retired men and women who come together to make new friends, learn new things, and have fun. There are over 4,000 Probus clubs in more than 100 countries, with over 400,000 members. Probus clubs are non-political, non-sectarian, and non-profit. They are self-governing and autonomous, and each club sets its own policies and activities.

On March 30, I gave my 12th annual lecture called Tech Talk at Hammock Dunes Club in Palm Coast, Florida where I live in the winter.

On March 23, gave a town hall-like speech and Q&A with the IT special interest group (SIG) of the New York Executive Forum. The event was via Zoom.

On April 19, I gave a talk and Q&A with a group of Union Carbide retirees. Some years ago, Union Carbide had its headquarters about a mile from where I live in Connecticut. The event was via Zoom.

There are many more videos of my lectures, interviews, etc. on my YouTube channel which you can find here.

AI Accuracy

AI Accuracy

Last week’s post was about AI Productivity. I thought it was a simple example, but it turned out not to be the case. I asked Gemini how far it was from our 8th floor terrace on the Atlantic Ocean to the horizon. Gemini’s response was so clear. It explained the logic, the formula, and the calculations with a result of 2.5 miles. It looked so straightforward, I did not challenge it. I should have.

Two readers, who have experience at sea, said 2.5 miles was not even close to the correct answer to my question. One of the two said, based on experience, the answer should be more like 11 miles. The other reader sent me a page from the Nautical Almanac which put the answer at 10.5 nautical miles (12 statue miles).

I sent the responses to Gemini. It said it was interesting that two experts you consulted provided a much larger distance (10-12 miles) for the horizon compared to the 2.5 miles we calculated. There are a couple of possibilities here. It’s possible there might be a misunderstanding in the information you received from the experts. The 2.5-mile distance is a well-established calculation based on the Earth’s curvature and your height above sea level. While atmospheric refraction can cause the horizon to appear slightly farther, it wouldn’t be a difference of several miles. And “perhaps the experts were considering a different scenario”. For example, it said if you were at a much higher altitude, like on top of a mountain or in a plane, the horizon would indeed be farther away. When I referred to the Nautical Almanac, Gemini said that’s an interesting detail! While nautical almanacs are excellent resources for maritime navigation, the information about the horizon distance in this case might be due to a misunderstanding because nautical almanacs typically focus on providing tables and data for celestial navigation. This includes information about the positions of stars, planets, and the Sun at various times throughout the year.

The more I went back to Gemini, the more ridiculous and defensive it became. Clearly, arithmetic is not a strong suit for Gemini. I finally threw in the towel and told Gemini I had done so. It said, “There’s no excuse for these mistakes. I apologize for the confusion and frustration they caused”.

AI shows both strengths and weaknesses when comparing its abilities in text and arithmetic. My experience has been AI is great with text. Not always but usually. On the other hand, I have found AI to be weak and inaccurate when it comes to numbers, arithmetic, and calculations. The distance to the horizon is the most extreme case I have experienced and the first time I have found the AI to be defensive.

To consider strengths and weaknesses in the area of text and understanding language nuances, AI can analyze vast amounts of text to understand complex grammar structures, semantics, and cultural references. This capability allows AI to translate languages with increasing accuracy, capturing the nuances and context of the original text. AI can condense lengthy documents into concise summaries, highlighting key points. Another strength of AI is sentiment analysis. It can identify the sentiment (positive, negative, neutral) expressed in text, such as when I threw in the towel with the calculation on the horizon. It can also be useful for social media monitoring or customer reviews.

     AI can be creative with text generation. It can generate different creative text formats, like poems, software code and scripts, musical pieces, even different writing styles. Recently, I showed my wife something I wrote with AI assistance. She said it was good but not my style. A strength of AI when it comes to style is you can tell it to re-write something. For example, you can prompt it to make it more formal, less formal, shorter, longer, bulletized, etc. I believe we will soon see an advance whereby you can feed the AI things you (or someone else) have written, and it will learn the style.

AI excels at searching through massive amounts of text to find relevant information based on keywords or concepts. This is crucial for tasks like web search. By leveraging AI to understand your search query, it can provide the most relevant results. If you don’t get exactly what you wanted, you can go into conversation mode. For example, you can say that is not what I wanted. I am looking for something like xyz. I have found conversation is the best way to maximize the value of AI.

When it comes to weaknesses, there are some significant ones. Sometimes the AI just seems to lack common sense reasoning. It can struggle with understanding the deeper meaning or implications of text which relies on common sense or real-world knowledge. Researchers around the world are working very hard to make improvements in this area.

 Probably the most important weakness is bias. When AI models are trained on biased data, it can perpetuate those biases in their outputs. This is a major concern when dealing with sensitive topics like race, gender, politics, or social issues. An area of concern is data poisoning where bad actors intentionally feed large amounts of biased or factually inaccurate data onto the web where it gets picked up by AI models.

When it comes to arithmetic strengths, Gemini touts exceptional speed and accuracy, far exceeding human capabilities. Ha ha. I would agree as AI technology continues to evolve, we can expect it to overcome its current limitations in all areas. In my talks and writing, I will continue to point out pluses and minuses of AI. There are plenty of each. In my book, Robot Attitude: How Robots and Artificial Intelligence Will Make Our Lives Better, I discussed many of the pluses in various industries, especially in healthcare.

Note: I use Gemini AI and other AI chatbots as my research assistants. AI can boost productivity for anyone who creates content. Sometimes I get incorrect data from AI, and when something looks suspicious, I dig deeper. Sometimes the data varies by sources where AI finds it. I take responsibility for my posts and if anyone spots an error, I will appreciate knowing it, and will correct it.

Current Events by John R. Patrick - 04/05/2024

New sections may appear every week or just when I have something new to share.

Yesterday was my 13th Tech Talk at Hammock Dunes Club. A PDF of my talk is at https://johnpatrick.com/techtalk13.pdf. The video took a long time to upload to my YouTube channel. I need to do some editing. I hope to have the final link next week.

The next talk is with the San Francisco Economic Forum on Wednesday via Zoom. I assume it is members only.

 
Tuscany gardener at work on the terrace.
Easter Brunch at Hammock Dunes Club with daughter and fam from St. Augustine.
A great brunch.
Shrimp galore!
The pool at Hammock Dunes Club
The new gym at Hammock Dunes Club
A helicopter flying below our terrace.
 

Here’s a glimpse into some of the key happenings in the crypto world this week (between April 2nd and April 5th, 2024):

Bitcoin Price Slump: After a strong rally in March, Bitcoin’s price has experienced a correction, dipping below $65,000 [CoinDesk]. Analysts are attributing this decline to a combination of factors, including profit-taking by investors and ongoing concerns about potential regulation.

Stablecoin Expansion Continues: Despite the Bitcoin price drop, the market capitalization of stablecoins (cryptocurrencies pegged to a fiat currency) continues to rise. This suggests that investors are seeking havens in stablecoins during periods of market volatility [The Block].

Focus on DeFi Security: Following some recent high-profile hacks of DeFi protocols, there’s a renewed focus on security measures within the DeFi space. Security audits and bug bounty programs are gaining traction as a way to identify and address vulnerabilities in DeFi platforms [Cointelegraph].

The Rise of Layer 3 Solutions: Layer 3 solutions, designed to improve scalability and interoperability between different blockchains, are attracting growing interest. A recent development involves Cosmos-based Picasso claiming to enable the first IBC (Inter-Blockchain Communication) connection with Ethereum [CoinDesk].

US Regulators Seek Public Input on Spot Bitcoin ETFs: The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has opened a public comment period on potential Spot Bitcoin ETFs (Exchange Traded Funds). This move could pave the way for the launch of Bitcoin ETFs in the US, potentially bringing more mainstream investors into the crypto market [Reuters].

Environmental Concerns and Crypto Mining: The debate surrounding the energy consumption of proof-of-work (PoW) mining used by Bitcoin and some other cryptocurrencies continues. This week, there were no major developments, but it remains a crucial topic for the long-term sustainability of the crypto ecosystem.

Remember: This is just a snapshot of the fast-paced crypto world. Stay tuned for further developments!

Let’s dive into some of the recent advancements in AI that captured attention this week (between April 2nd and April 5th, 2024):

1. AI for Personalized Learning: Researchers are exploring new ways to use AI for personalized learning experiences. This week, a study showcased an AI-powered tutoring system that tailors learning plans to individual student needs, potentially improving educational outcomes [Science Daily].

2. AI-powered Robots with Enhanced Dexterity: The quest for robots that can handle complex tasks continues. This week, a research team unveiled an AI system that allows robots to perform actions requiring dexterity and fine motor skills, like using tools or manipulating objects [IEEE Spectrum]. This could revolutionize automation in various industries, from manufacturing to healthcare.

3. Progress in Explainable AI (XAI): As AI models become more complex, the need to understand their decision-making process grows. This week, there were advancements in XAI techniques. Researchers developed methods to make it easier to interpret how AI models arrive at their conclusions, fostering trust and transparency in their applications [VentureBeat].

4. AI tackles Climate Change Challenges: AI is being harnessed to address climate change issues. This week, a group launched an AI platform designed to analyze vast datasets on climate and develop strategies for mitigating climate risks [TechCrunch]. This is an ongoing effort where AI can play a crucial role in creating sustainable solutions.

5. Generative AI for Material Discovery: Scientists are exploring the potential of generative AI models to accelerate material discovery. This week, there was news about an AI system designed to generate new materials with desired properties, potentially leading to breakthroughs in fields like medicine and clean energy [Nature Journal].

These are just a few examples of the exciting developments in AI. You can find more details by searching for terms like “AI Weekly” or “Last Week in AI”.

We are traveling back to CT on Friday. The GAMMNAT sheet is as of close on Wednesday.

I have appeared in two new articles this month:

Sun and Surf Magazine of Palm Coast, FL published, “AI: Should We Fear it or Embrace it?”

A new magazine in Ridgefield, CT called Ridgefield City Lifestyle has published, “AI and Healthcare: A conversation with Dr. John patrick about how AI is transforming the healthcare space

Following are videos of talks I gave this year. I have been fortunate to be able to share my thoughts on technology with a number of groups. 

On September 14, I gave a talk on AI at the Ridgefield Library in Ridgefield, CT.

On July 21, I gave a lecture on AI @FoundersHallCT. I wan’t sure how many would turn out. It was a lot. Great interest in the topic. In addition to current events and outlooks, I told the audience about Robot Attitude: How Robots and Artificial Intelligence Will Make Our Lives Better

On March 8th I was the guest speaker at the first meeting of Probus in Palm Coast, Florida on March 8. Probus is a worldwide organization of retired and semi-retired men and women who come together to make new friends, learn new things, and have fun. There are over 4,000 Probus clubs in more than 100 countries, with over 400,000 members. Probus clubs are non-political, non-sectarian, and non-profit. They are self-governing and autonomous, and each club sets its own policies and activities.

On March 30, I gave my 12th annual lecture called Tech Talk at Hammock Dunes Club in Palm Coast, Florida where I live in the winter.

On March 23, gave a town hall-like speech and Q&A with the IT special interest group (SIG) of the New York Executive Forum. The event was via Zoom.

On April 19, I gave a talk and Q&A with a group of Union Carbide retirees. Some years ago, Union Carbide had its headquarters about a mile from where I live in Connecticut. The event was via Zoom.

There are many more videos of my lectures, interviews, etc. on my YouTube channel which you can find here.

Productivity with AI

Productivity with AI

In my talks and writing, I try to point out pluses and minuses of AI. There are plenty of each. In my book, Robot Attitude: How Robots and Artificial Intelligence Will Make Our Lives Better, I discussed many of the pluses in various industries, especially in healthcare. In this blog post, I will discuss some pluses in productivity with AI.

One morning recently, I was sitting on our terrace watching the waves roll up on the beach. It was a crystal-clear day all of the way out to the horizon. Occasionally, we will see a container ship or a cruise ship. This day, there was nothing out there, all the way to the horizon. I asked myself how far is it from where I am sitting to the horizon. So, I asked Gemini AI the following question:

“I am sitting on the eighth floor of our condo building on the Atlantic ocean. What is the distance from here to the horizon?” Almost instantly, Gemini responded with the following:

To estimate the distance to the horizon from your eighth-floor condo overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, we can use the formula for the distance to the horizon based on height above sea level. Here’s what we can do:

  1. Estimate your height: You’re on the eighth floor. Assuming typical floor heights of around 10 feet, being on the eighth floor would put you at about 80 feet above sea level.
  2. Use the formula: There are online calculators for this purpose, but you can also use the following formula: Distance to horizon (miles) = sqrt(observer height (feet) 0.000052)
  3. Plug in your estimated height: Assuming 80 feet, here’s the calculation: In miles: Distance = sqrt(80 0.000052) ≈ 2.9 miles Therefore, the distance to the horizon from your vantage point is estimated to be around 2.9 miles. Keep in mind: This is a rough estimate. Actual visibility can be affected by factors like air pressure, temperature, and curvature of the Earth (which isn’t a perfect sphere).

I had thought about this question some years ago when one of children was visiting. We took some guesses about far away the horizon was, but they were just guesses. I said I could figure it out. I could have just Googled for a tool to do the job but I wanted to see if I could do it myself. I got a tablet and drew a diagram showing Earth and a tall building sitting on it. I was able to make the calculation but it took a while. Certainly not “almost instantly” as Gemini could do. This is just a trivial example of how AI can boost productivity.

AI can boost productivity in many ways, freeing up your time and streamlining your workflow. Following are some examples.

  • Automating Repetitive Tasks: AI excels at handling repetitive and time-consuming tasks which slow you down. This can include data entry, scheduling appointments, generating reports, or processing invoices. By automating these tasks, AI allows you to focus on more strategic and creative work.
  • Enhanced Decision-Making: AI can analyze vast amounts of data to identify patterns and trends that humans might miss. This can be incredibly valuable for making informed decisions. For instance, AI can help with sales forecasting, risk management, or product development by providing insights based on customer data and market trends.
  • Improved Communication and Collaboration: AI can power chatbots and virtual assistants which can answer questions, translate languages, and schedule meetings. This can free up your time for more focused communication and collaboration with colleagues. Additionally, AI-powered translation tools can enhance communication across borders and time zones.
  • Personalized Workflows and Content Creation: AI can personalize tasks and content creation to individual needs and preferences. Imagine scheduling tools that learn your availability and preferences, or content creation platforms which suggest relevant topics and formats based on your audience.
  • Content Curation and Summarization: AI can sift through vast amounts of information and curate relevant content for you. This can be helpful for research, staying updated on industry trends, or finding specific information within large documents. AI can also summarize lengthy reports or articles, saving you valuable time.
  • Error Detection and Quality Assurance: AI can be trained to identify errors and inconsistencies in data or documents. This can help improve the quality of your work and ensure accuracy in tasks like financial reporting or legal document review.
  • Predictive Maintenance and Resource Allocation: AI can analyze sensor data from equipment to predict maintenance needs and prevent downtime. This proactive approach can save businesses money and resources. Additionally, AI can help optimize resource allocation by analyzing workload and assigning tasks efficiently.

These are just some examples of how AI can boost productivity. As AI technology continues to evolve, we can expect even more innovative applications that will transform the way we work. This will take place everywhere: big companies, little companies, for-profits, not-for-profits. Will AI eliminate millions of jobs? Perhaps in the not-too-distant future. In the shorter term, many organizations in almost all industries are facing significant staffing shortages. With AI productivity, existing staff will be able to fill needed shortages.

Note: I use Gemini AI and other AI chatbots as my research assistants. AI can boost productivity for anyone who creates content. Sometimes I get incorrect data from AI, and when something looks suspicious, I dig deeper. Sometimes the data varies by sources where AI finds it. I take responsibility for my posts and if anyone spots an error, I will appreciate knowing it, and will correct it.

Current Events by John R. Patrick - 03/29/2024

New sections may appear every week or just when I have something new to share.

Yesterday was my 13th Tech Talk at Hammock Dunes Club. A PDF of my talk is at https://johnpatrick.com/techtalk13.pdf. The video is still uploading to my YouTube channel. I will have the link next week. A half dozen talks will take place in Connecticut in April. More on that later.

 
The Doo Woo Project at the Fitzgerald Center for Performing Arts in Palm Coast. The music was fantastic.

I invested in Atom Limbs in early 2021. Their technology is quite impressive. Watch a very short video here. I put this one in the high risk category. As always, remember most startups fail. Never invest in a startup unless you are prepared to lose every penny you invest.

Here’s a glimpse into some of the interesting happenings in the crypto world this week (as of March 29, 2024):

SBF: The big news was that Sam was sentenced to 25 years. I had guessed it would be 30 years. Zero impact on the growth of Bitcoin.

Bitcoin’s Price Rollercoaster: Bitcoin’s price has continued its volatility. After dipping below $63,000 on March 19th, it’s climbed back near $70,000 [CoinDesk]. Analysts are still debating the factors driving this volatility, with some citing profit-taking after a strong rally and others pointing to jitters around potential regulation.

Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) Gain Traction: Several central banks, including China and India, are actively piloting CBDC initiatives. This week, the Bank of England released a discussion paper exploring the potential design features of a digital pound [Bank of England]. The growing interest in CBDCs could significantly impact the traditional financial landscape and potentially even the crypto ecosystem.

Metaverse Land Grab Heats Up: The race for virtual land in the metaverse continues. This week, reports emerged of a record-breaking $5 million purchase of virtual land in The Sandbox metaverse platform [Reuters]. These high-value transactions highlight the increasing interest in the potential of the metaverse for gaming, social interaction, and even commerce.

Environmental Concerns and Crypto Mining: The energy consumption of proof-of-work (PoW) mining, used by Bitcoin and some other cryptocurrencies, remains a contentious issue. This week, Elon Musk reignited the debate with a tweet suggesting Tesla might resume accepting Bitcoin payments if there’s a move towards more sustainable mining practices [Cointelegraph].

Security Concerns and DeFi Hacks: Unfortunately, DeFi protocols continue to be targeted by hackers. This week, a vulnerability in a lesser-known DeFi platform resulted in a significant hack. This emphasizes the importance of robust security measures and user awareness for DeFi participants [Coindesk].

Remember, this is just a snapshot of the ever-dynamic crypto space. Stay tuned for further developments!

Let’s dive into some of the recent advancements in AI grabbing headlines this week (as of March 29, 2024):

1. Generative AI for Drug Discovery: Researchers are exploring the potential of generative AI models to accelerate drug discovery. This week, a study showcased how AI can be used to design new molecules with desired properties, potentially leading to faster development of life-saving medications [Science News].

2. AI-powered Robots Get Crafty: Robots are becoming more adept at manipulating objects and performing complex tasks. This week, researchers unveiled an AI system that allows robots to perform tasks requiring dexterity and fine motor skills, such as folding laundry or assembling furniture [IEEE Spectrum]. This could revolutionize automation in various industries.

3. The Ethics of Large Language Models (LLMs): As LLMs like me become more powerful, the conversation surrounding their ethical implications continues. This week, an article in Nature explored the potential biases present in training data for LLMs, highlighting the importance of responsible development and deployment of these models [Nature Journal].

4. AI for Climate Change Solutions: AI is being harnessed to tackle climate change challenges. This week, a group of researchers launched an AI platform designed to analyze climate data and develop strategies for mitigating climate risks [Techcrunch].

5. Explainable AI Gains Momentum: As AI models become more complex, the need to understand their decision-making process grows. This week, there were advancements in explainable AI (XAI) techniques, making it easier to interpret how AI models arrive at their conclusions, fostering trust and transparency in their applications [VentureBeat].

These are just a few exciting developments, and you can find more details by searching for terms like “AI Weekly” or “Last Week in AI”.

I have appeared in two new articles this month:

Sun and Surf Magazine of Palm Coast, FL published, “AI: Should We Fear it or Embrace it?”

A new magazine in Ridgefield, CT called Ridgefield City Lifestyle has published, “AI and Healthcare: A conversation with Dr. John patrick about how AI is transforming the healthcare space

Following are videos of talks I gave this year. I have been fortunate to be able to share my thoughts on technology with a number of groups. 

On September 14, I gave a talk on AI at the Ridgefield Library in Ridgefield, CT.

On July 21, I gave a lecture on AI @FoundersHallCT. I wan’t sure how many would turn out. It was a lot. Great interest in the topic. In addition to current events and outlooks, I told the audience about Robot Attitude: How Robots and Artificial Intelligence Will Make Our Lives Better

On March 8th I was the guest speaker at the first meeting of Probus in Palm Coast, Florida on March 8. Probus is a worldwide organization of retired and semi-retired men and women who come together to make new friends, learn new things, and have fun. There are over 4,000 Probus clubs in more than 100 countries, with over 400,000 members. Probus clubs are non-political, non-sectarian, and non-profit. They are self-governing and autonomous, and each club sets its own policies and activities.

On March 30, I gave my 12th annual lecture called Tech Talk at Hammock Dunes Club in Palm Coast, Florida where I live in the winter.

On March 23, gave a town hall-like speech and Q&A with the IT special interest group (SIG) of the New York Executive Forum. The event was via Zoom.

On April 19, I gave a talk and Q&A with a group of Union Carbide retirees. Some years ago, Union Carbide had its headquarters about a mile from where I live in Connecticut. The event was via Zoom.

There are many more videos of my lectures, interviews, etc. on my YouTube channel which you can find here.

Podcasting

Podcasting

In the pre-dawn of the internet age, a new kind of voice crackled through the wires. It wasn’t the smooth tones of radio DJs or the formal pronouncements of news anchors. This was something different, a rebellion against the one-way flow of information. In the 1980s, audio blogging emerged, a whisper of a concept – sharing snippets of your life, your thoughts, your voice, recorded and sent out into the digital unknown.

A decade later, the seeds of change were sown. Carl Malamud, a pioneer of open information, launched “Internet Talk Radio,” a harbinger of things to come. As MP3 players like the Rio PMP 100 sashayed onto the scene, the ability to store and share digital audio became easier than ever. The stage was set.

The year 2000 arrived, a blank canvas waiting to be splashed with audio creativity. Audible, with its downloadable audiobooks, offered a glimpse into the future of portable listening. Apple’s iTunes, meanwhile, was laying the groundwork for a digital music revolution, quietly putting the power of organization in the hands of music lovers.

Then, in 2003, a spark ignited the flame. Chris Lydon, with his “audio blog post: back then,” arguably launched the first true podcast. The term itself, though, remained stubbornly uncoined. But 2004 was a different story. Ben Hammersley, a writer for the Guardian, took a bite of the apple (quite literally) and birthed the now-ubiquitous term “podcasting,” a clever fusion of “iPod” and “broadcasting.” Software like Adam Curry’s iPodder sprang up, allowing users to subscribe to these new audio shows and download them automatically. The audience was there, the technology was primed, and all that was missing was a way to connect them.

Apple, ever the trendsetter, filled that gap in 2004. By including a podcast directory in iTunes, they made podcasts discoverable for the masses. Suddenly, millions had access to a world of voices, stories, and information, all at their fingertips (or, more accurately, earbuds).

I put my toe in the water with my first self-published podcast on May 5, 2005. The title of the podcast was “Podcasting for The School Bus”. It was just a minute and a half long and you can listen to it here. I was a bit ahead of my time, and I lost interest in podcasting and so did my readers.

Then later in 2005, the dam broke. Subscription rates skyrocketed, with iTunes becoming the go-to platform for podcast exploration. Even President George W. Bush got in on the act, becoming the first US president to deliver his weekly address via podcast. To solidify its place in pop culture history, “podcast” was declared the New Oxford American Dictionary’s Word of the Year.

The story doesn’t end there. Podcasting has exploded into a universe of its own. From true-crime sagas that keep you up at night to educational deep dives that spark curiosity, there’s a podcast for everyone. Monetization models have sprung up, with podcasters finding innovative ways to support their craft. Technology has kept pace, offering crystal-clear audio, user-friendly apps, and streaming services to make listening a seamless experience.

The exact number of podcasts globally is difficult to pinpoint due to the ever-changing nature of the medium. The estimated number of podcasts is 3 to 4.3 million. This range captures the most cited figures.

     I got back in the game in March of this year. A doctor friend of mine in Florida called me one day and told me, through his widespread knowledge of sports and sport celebrities, he had connected with Ron Cey. Ron was a star 3rd baseman for the Los Angeles Dodgers back in the 80’s. His current business is podcasting. Ron opines on the latest sports and entertainment news, and features a wide selection of guests, including me. The Ron Cey Show, “We’ll See About That” is a good place for podcast excellence. You can subscribe to his podcasts and listen to them on your preferred platform including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon, or Google Podcasts.

You can listen to my podcast with Ron Cey here.

Today, podcasting is a powerful force, a testament to the human desire to connect, to share, and to listen. With millions of podcasts and a global audience ever on the rise, this is just the first chapter in the ever-unfolding narrative of audio storytelling.

Note: I use Gemini AI and other AI chatbots as my research assistants. AI can boost productivity for anyone who creates content. Sometimes I get incorrect data from AI, and when something looks suspicious, I dig deeper. Sometimes the data varies by sources where AI finds it. I take responsibility for my posts and if anyone spots an error, I will appreciate knowing it, and will correct it.

 

 

Current Events by John R. Patrick - 03/22/2024

New sections may appear every week or just when I have something new to share.

 
St. Patrick’s Day dinner at Hammock Dunes Club.
Neil Berg’s 50 Years of Rock & Roll at EMMA Concert Association at the Lewis Auditorium at Flagler College in St. Augustine. It was a highly entertaining look at the history of iconic music featuring the best musicians and authentic Broadway/Rock & Roll artists in the world. The evening told the story of America since the 1930s, and all the incredible influences and cultures that make up our “melting pot,” which is poured into the fabric of our music, which influenced generations around the world.
This was unexpected treat. The Ron Cey podcasting shows sends a gift from Melissa’s Exotic Tropical Fruits for each guest of his podcast show. Delightful fruits some of which I never heard of.
 

I invested in Atom Limbs in early 2021. Their technology is quite impressive. Watch a very short video here. I put this one in the high risk category. As always, remember most startups fail. Never invest in a startup unless you are prepared to lose every penny you invest.

Here’s a summary of some interesting things happening in crypto this week (as of March 22, 2024):

  • Bitcoin price rollercoaster: Bitcoin’s price has been volatile, dropping below $63,000 on March 19th, leading to some liquidations (forced selling) by traders. However, it since climbed back up near $68,000 but as of this writing is below $64,000. I think things will stabilize as the BTC ETFs build up. But, who knows?
  • Dogecoin soars on futures hopes: Dogecoin (DOGE) saw an 18% price increase this week on speculation of the launch of DOGE futures contracts. This seems doubtful to me. My average cost for my DOGE is 5 cents.
  • Grayscale outflows slow down: There were major outflows from Grayscale’s Bitcoin Trust (GBTC) earlier this week, but analysts believe this might be tapering off [Cointelegraph].
  • Blackrock joins the tokenization party: Investment giant Blackrock entered the crypto space with a new fund on the Ethereum network that focuses on tokenized assets. I do not see an Ethereum ETF anytime soon. 
  • Bitcoin Virtual Machine (BVM) for AI? The BVM might soon allow users to create artificial intelligence models directly on the Bitcoin network [CoinDesk].

It’s important to note that crypto news can change rapidly, so these are just some of the highlights from this week.

Let’s delve into some of the recent advancements in AI this week (as of March 22, 2024):

        • Nvidia’s powerhouse chip: Nvidia unveiled their latest AI chip, the Blackwell architecture, boasting 30 times faster performance for specific tasks compared to its predecessor [AI Weekly]. This could significantly accelerate AI development.
        • Humanoid robotics get a boost: Nvidia partnered with leading robotics companies for their new AI platform, GR00T, aiming to develop foundational models for general-purpose humanoid robots [AI Weekly]. This has the potential to revolutionize various fields like manufacturing and healthcare.
        • AI ethics in question: There’s ongoing debate about “empathic” AI, with some experts arguing it leans more towards psychopathy rather than true emotional intelligence. This highlights the importance of ethical considerations in AI development [Tech Xplore].
        • AI tool aids cancer detection: Researchers developed an AI tool that can identify signs of cancer missed by doctors, potentially leading to earlier diagnoses and improved patient outcomes [Artificial Intelligence News].
        • Introspective AI thrives on diversity: A new study suggests that AI models that consider diverse perspectives during training outperform those with limited viewpoints [ScienceDaily]. This emphasizes the importance of inclusivity in building robust AI systems.

        These are just a few exciting developments, and you can find more details by searching for “AI Weekly” or “Last Week in AI”.

I have appeared in two new articles this month:

Sun and Surf Magazine of Palm Coast, FL published, “AI: Should We Fear it or Embrace it?”

A new magazine in Ridgefield, CT called Ridgefield City Lifestyle has published, “AI and Healthcare: A conversation with Dr. John patrick about how AI is transforming the healthcare space

Following are videos of talks I gave this year. I have been fortunate to be able to share my thoughts on technology with a number of groups. 

On September 14, I gave a talk on AI at the Ridgefield Library in Ridgefield, CT.

On July 21, I gave a lecture on AI @FoundersHallCT. I wan’t sure how many would turn out. It was a lot. Great interest in the topic. In addition to current events and outlooks, I told the audience about Robot Attitude: How Robots and Artificial Intelligence Will Make Our Lives Better

On March 8th I was the guest speaker at the first meeting of Probus in Palm Coast, Florida on March 8. Probus is a worldwide organization of retired and semi-retired men and women who come together to make new friends, learn new things, and have fun. There are over 4,000 Probus clubs in more than 100 countries, with over 400,000 members. Probus clubs are non-political, non-sectarian, and non-profit. They are self-governing and autonomous, and each club sets its own policies and activities.

On March 30, I gave my 12th annual lecture called Tech Talk at Hammock Dunes Club in Palm Coast, Florida where I live in the winter.

On March 23, gave a town hall-like speech and Q&A with the IT special interest group (SIG) of the New York Executive Forum. The event was via Zoom.

On April 19, I gave a talk and Q&A with a group of Union Carbide retirees. Some years ago, Union Carbide had its headquarters about a mile from where I live in Connecticut. The event was via Zoom.

There are many more videos of my lectures, interviews, etc. on my YouTube channel which you can find here.

How Vision Pro Could Change Healthcare

How Vision Pro Could Change Healthcare

VR (Virtual Reality) and AR (Augmented Reality) headsets like Apple’s Vision Pro hold immense potential to revolutionize various aspects of healthcare. I have mentioned these technologies could improve patient care, medical training, and more in prior posts. The purpose of this post is to add some specifics.

I will focus on some of the areas where I see potential. These include patient care, enhanced diagnosis and treatment, improved patient education and engagement, remote monitoring and telemedicine, medical training and education, improved collaboration, and knowledge sharing.

In the area of patient care, enhanced diagnosis and treatment can potentially take advantage of augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR). Vision Pro’s AR capabilities could overlay medical scans and patient data directly onto a doctor’s field of view during examinations. This could allow for a more precise understanding of a patient’s anatomy, potentially leading to improved diagnosis and treatment planning. Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) could create immersive environments to help patients manage phobias and anxieties. For example, a patient with a fear of heights could undergo gradual exposure therapy in a virtual world.

When it comes to improving patient education and engagement, interactive learning with VR could have an impact. VR experiences could provide patients with a more interactive and engaging way to learn about their conditions and treatment options. Another area with potential is pain management and distraction. VR could be used to distract patients from pain during procedures or chronic pain management. AR-powered remote diagnostics also has potential. Doctors could utilize AR features to remotely examine patients and guide healthcare professionals at the patient’s location. VR/AR could facilitate more interactive and engaging telemedicine and communications and consultations between patient and doctor.

One of the big areas I see is medical training and education through immersive learning experiences. VR could create realistic simulations of medical procedures, allowing medical students and professionals to practice in a safe and controlled environment. For surgical training, surgeons could practice complex procedures in VR before performing them on real patients. Facebook has been advertising this area. They feature Dr. Anushree Baid, a resident at Dr. Shroff’s Charity Eye Hospital. Dr. Baid used FundamentalVR and the Orbis International’s VR platform (a competitor to Vision Pro) for additional training in a hands-on environment. She said, “VR let me practice hundreds of times before I operated on a patient”. In the past year, Dr. Baid has performed 300 life-changing surgeries (real) to preserve her patients’ vision.

     Another medical training area will no doubt be anatomy exploration. VR can allow students to explore the human body in 3D, providing a more comprehensive understanding of anatomy. This is not a new area. I wrote about the Visible Human more than 25 years ago. What makes this more practical today is the advanced technology such as the Vision Pro. Let me share an example of real this is.

An app available only on the Apple Vision Pro allows you to meet NASA’s Perseverance Rover on a mission to explore the surface of Mars. Perseverance launched from Florida in 2020 and landed on Mars on February 18, 2021. The rover is collecting samples and analyzing the geology, atmosphere, and chemistry of Mars to search for signs of past life in and around Jezero Crater.

Version 1 of the Vision Pro app brings Perseverance into the room with you. Just by looking at key parts of the rover, you can view photographs and specifications plus learn how they contribute to the groundbreaking science of NASA’s Mars Exploration Program. You can resize the rover from a small model you can rest on your lap to actual size and move it anywhere in your space. It literally fills the room. In Version 2, coming soon, you’ll be able to stand on Mars, fully immersed in the sights and sounds of our nearest planetary neighbor. Seeing this will make you a believer in the medical training possibilities. I am bullish on this.

 Another area is improved collaboration and knowledge sharing. VR/AR could enable medical professionals from different locations to collaborate remotely on complex cases or training sessions. VR simulations could ensure consistent and standardized training experiences for medical professionals.

VR/AR technology is still evolving, and the cost of high-quality headsets might be a barrier for some healthcare institutions. As VR/AR integrates with patient data, robust measures are crucial to ensure privacy and security. Developing user-friendly and comfortable headsets is essential for widespread adoption in healthcare settings. The Apple Vision Pro weighs 1.5 pounds. I don’t mind the weight for an hour or so, but much more than that makes me very aware of the weight.

Overall, VR and AR technologies like Vision Pro offer exciting possibilities for the future of healthcare. By enhancing diagnosis and treatment, improving patient education, and revolutionizing medical training, VR/AR has the potential to significantly improve patient outcomes and the overall healthcare experience.

Read about advanced technology in healthcare in Health Attitude: Unraveling and Solving the Complexities of Healthcare.

Note: I use Gemini AI and other AI chatbots as my research assistants. AI could boost productivity for anyone who creates content. Sometimes I get incorrect data from AI, and when something looks suspicious, I dig deeper. Sometimes the data varies by sources where AI finds it. I take responsibility for my posts and if anyone spots an error, I will appreciate knowing it, and will correct it.